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Fox News aired a 2011 photo of a Japanese convenient store to bash ‘bare shelves Biden’

The photograph, which was meant to reflect empty shelves in US supermarkets, was actually taken in Ofunato, Japan in 2011. ...

FoxNews Primetime segment
The "Fox News Primetime" segment on January 12, 2022.

  • "Fox News Primetime" aired a segment about rising inflation and empty stores, and attacked Biden.
  • One of the photos it used is actually a 2011 Associated Press photo of an empty Japanese convenient store.

"Fox News Primetime" appeared to have aired a 2011 photo of an empty Japanese convenience store to bash President Joe Biden over inflation.

In its Wednesday segment, the show at one point superimposed an image of Biden over a picture of empty shelves at a store, as can be seen in a clip published by Mediaite.

That photo was actually taken by the Associated Press photographer Shizuo Kambayashi on March 15, 2011, shortly after the nearby Fukushima nuclear plant was destroyed by an earthquake and tsunami.

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As that image appeared on the Fox News segment, the guest host Rachel Campos Duffy said: "Throughout the country supermarket shelves remain barren. From New York to Virginia, all the way to Alaska, people are left without groceries and can't put dinner on the table," as can be seen in the Mediaite clip.

"And they are upset. No surprise, #BareShelvesBiden was trending on Twitter. But, perhaps, what is most troubling is this might only be the beginning," she said.

Fox News did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment. 

The report comes as the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that annual inflation hit 7% in December — the highest level in nearly 40 years. 

Some grocery shelves across the country have been left bare this week following persistent supply-chain issues, which have largely been caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, DailyMail.com reported.

In response to the inflation figures, Biden said that had been some progress in slowing the rate of inflation, but acknowledged there was "more work to do with price increases still too high," Reuters reported.

Read the original article on Business Insider

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